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Posts Tagged: Kristen Kolb

Her Name Was Olive

Olive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Her name was Olive.

Every Friday morning she'd come bounding over to greet me, her tail wagging happily, one ear up, one ear down.

I called her "My Second Favorite Dog" and nicknamed her "The Bee Garden Mascot."

Her owner, Kristen Kolb of Davis, was one of the 19 founding gardeners who tended the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee friendly garden planted in September 2009 next to the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis.

As Kris weeded, planted and pruned, and hauled away the clippings, Olive tagged along, showcasing her trademark windshield-wiper tail,  gentle brown eyes and topsy-turvy ears.  

Kris and Olive were inseparable. They exchanged hugs and licks and conversation. This was a dog well-loved.

Olive's loyalty reminded me of my childhood dog, Ted, who followed me everywhere on the family farm. He watched me weed the vegetable garden, pick blackberries, and once jumped into the Cowlitz River and swam to our fishing boat. When I went off to college 400 miles away, Ted died. I think he died of a broken heart.

Olive died of cancer. Kris wrote me a note yesterday: "I know you loved her, too.  She was about 12, and yes, from the shelter.  We were so lucky to find each other and have 10+ wonderful years together.  She loved the garden and the gardeners (haven coordinator Missy Borel Gable, team leader Mary Patterson, and Randy Beaton, Tyng Tyng Cheng, Judy Hills, Carolyn Hinshaw, Marion London,  Kate McDonald, Kathy Olson, Nancy Stone, Janet Thatcher, Laura Westrup, Nyla Wiebe, Gary Zamzow, Kili Bong, Evan Marczak, Laurie Hildebrandt and Joe Frankenfield) and being a part of it all.  Thank you for appreciating what a special dog she was."

Together the 19 founding gardeners donated 5200 hours to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology between May 2010 and February 2013. Missy Borel Gable, former program manager of the California Center for Urban Horticulture at UC Davis,  now directs the statewide UC Master Gardeners' Program. Many of her colleagues  are continuing their volunteer work in the UC Davis Arboretum

The "haven saviors" made a difference.  Under their care, the Sacramento Bee named the haven one of the Top 10 Garden Destinations in the area. But they were more than gardeners, volunteers and friends. They were family. They all took time to laugh, to talk about their lives, plans and plants (not necessarily in that order)  and to watch the honey bees, bumble bees, butterflies, carpenter bees, European wool carder bees, metallic sweat bees, syrphids, ladybugs, bigeyed bugs, assassin bugs, lacewings, praying mantids, jumping spiders and web weavers--and an occasional red-tailed hawk,  great-horned owl and jackrabbit. 

And they all knew, as did I, what a very special dog Olive was. 

Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive attentively watches for Kris Kolb. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sarah Hodge pets Olive, while Kris Kolb gardens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olive faithfully follows Kris Kolb as she hauls away clippings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 20, 2013 at 10:14 PM

Shall We Prey?

The California Buckeye (Junonia coenia), with its bold eyespots and white bars, is an easily recognizable butterfly.

The problem: getting close enough for a photo and then patiently waiting for it to open its wings. At the first indication of danger, it flutters away.

The eyespots are supposed to scare away predators, but they certainly don't scare away a praying mantis.

Kristen Kolb, master gardener extraordinaire who helps tend the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road, University of California, Davis,  recently spotted a ripped-apart Buckeye in the sedum.

We suspect a praying mantis grabbed it and feasted on the head, thorax and abdomen, leaving behind the wings.

The wings with the bold eyespots.

Buckeye spreads it wings on an African daisy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Buckeye spreads it wings on an African daisy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Buckeye spreads it wings on an African daisy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Shattered Buckeye, probably the work of a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Shattered Buckeye, probably the work of a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Shattered Buckeye, probably the work of a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The predator? Could have been this praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The predator? Could have been this praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The predator? Could have been this praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2011 at 8:27 PM
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