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peer-reviewed research article

Drip and furrow irrigation of fresh market tomatoes on a slowly permeable soil: Tomatoes: Part 2. water relations

authors

D. W. Grimes, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
V. H. Schweers, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
P. L. Wiley, University of California

publication information

California Agriculture 30(2):11-13. DOI: 10.3733/ca.v030n02p11. February 1976.

abstract

Frequent furrow irrigation of fresh market tomatoes, on a sandy loam soil, caused the soil surface to seal, greatly restricting water penetration into the plant root zone. Water penetration in furrows was adequate throughout the season if the frequency of irrigation was lowered. A drip irrigation system maintains not only a desirable soil moisture distribution, but also the cultural advantage of a dry surface area for foot traffic of harvesters that improves their efficiency and reduces soil compaction.

author notes

The assistance of personnel at the Lindcove Field Station.is gratefully acknowledged