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California Agriculture, July 1976

Volume 30, Number 7
Special Issue: Hopland Field Station: 25 years of research.

research articles

Wildlife research is diverse, productive
by W.M. Longhurst
pp8-10, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p8
Abstract
Not available – first paragraph follows: The wildlife research program at the Hopland Field Station has been a cooperative effort involving primarily researchers from the Davis and Berkeley campuses and, occasionally, researchers from other state and federal agencies, California state universities, Oregon State University, and certain private companies. The station has also served as a base of operations for other research projects in nearby counties.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Fertility studies reveal plant & soil needs
by M.B. Jones
pp13-15, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p13
Abstract
Not available – first paragraph follows: Proper fertilization is important in realizing the great potential from the annual grasslands of California. One of the first studies indicated that forage production on improved dry-land pasture fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus increased ten-fold over untreated pastures during the winter months of feed shortage. In another study it was found that fertilized pastures yielded about 3 1/2 times as much meat and wool as unfertilized pastures over the growing seas on.
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Watershed management increases rangeland productivity
by A.H. Murphy
pp16, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p16
Abstract
Not available – first paragraph follows: The need for water in all phases of California's economic development has put strong emphasis on research toward maximum use of this resource. Wildland watersheds supply approximately 95 percent of the state's water. Consequently, an understanding of water-shed management is necessary to obtain the highest water yields.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Vegetation changes produce benefits
by A.H. Murphy, H.F. Heady, J.W. Menke
pp22-24, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p22
Abstract
Not available – first paragraph follows: The Hopland range area has more than 500 plant species, some of which were introduced from other parts of the world, and an understanding of the ecology of these plants is important for intelligent management of the vegetation.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Sheep research stresses management, nutrition, and breeding
by D.T. Torell, W.C. Weir, G.E. Bradford
pp27-31, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p27
Abstract
Not available – first paragraph follows: Goals of the Hopland Field Station's sheep research program have been to increase production by increasing the number of lambs born, improving lamb survival, increasing weaning weights, economically meeting the nutritional needs of sheep, and developing more productive strains of sheep.
Expanded Abstract | PDF

Editorial, News, Letters and Science briefs

EDITORIAL: A salute to Hopland
by J. B. Kendrick
pp2, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p2
PDF

Germination of seeds from carrot, lettuce, and pepper plants grown under severe nutrient deficiencies
by James F. Harrington
pp219-235, doi#10.3733/hilg.v30n07p219
Abstract
Plants of carrot, lettuce, and pepper were grown in sand cultures receiving either a complete nutrient solution or one deficient in N, P, K, or Ca. An effort was made to produce severe deficiency, but not to a point at which no seeds would be produced. Plants showed various deficiency symptoms, including necrosis of the growing tips, with calcium deficiency, and necrotic spots along the leaf margins in the case of potassium deficiency. Seed yields were always depressed by low N, P, K, or Ca treatments. Percentage of normal seeds was depressed by low N, K, or Ca, but not by low P. At harvest, seeds from low Nand P treatments usually showed the same germination as that of seeds receiving complete solution. However, K deficiency resulted in lower germination in some experiments, as did Ca deficiency in carrots and peppers. In storage, seeds from low K and Ca treatments declined in germination faster than did seeds from the complete-solution treatments.
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Germination of seeds from carrot, lettuce, and pepper plants grown under severe nutrient deficiencies
by James F. Harrington
pp219-235, doi#10.3733/hilg.v30n07p219
Abstract
Plants of carrot, lettuce, and pepper were grown in sand cultures receiving either a complete nutrient solution or one deficient in N, P, K, or Ca. An effort was made to produce severe deficiency, but not to a point at which no seeds would be produced. Plants showed various deficiency symptoms, including necrosis of the growing tips, with calcium deficiency, and necrotic spots along the leaf margins in the case of potassium deficiency. Seed yields were always depressed by low N, P, K, or Ca treatments. Percentage of normal seeds was depressed by low N, K, or Ca, but not by low P. At harvest, seeds from low Nand P treatments usually showed the same germination as that of seeds receiving complete solution. However, K deficiency resulted in lower germination in some experiments, as did Ca deficiency in carrots and peppers. In storage, seeds from low K and Ca treatments declined in germination faster than did seeds from the complete-solution treatments.
PDF

Germination of seeds from carrot, lettuce, and pepper plants grown under severe nutrient deficiencies
by James F. Harrington
pp219-235, doi#10.3733/hilg.v30n07p219
Abstract
Plants of carrot, lettuce, and pepper were grown in sand cultures receiving either a complete nutrient solution or one deficient in N, P, K, or Ca. An effort was made to produce severe deficiency, but not to a point at which no seeds would be produced. Plants showed various deficiency symptoms, including necrosis of the growing tips, with calcium deficiency, and necrotic spots along the leaf margins in the case of potassium deficiency. Seed yields were always depressed by low N, P, K, or Ca treatments. Percentage of normal seeds was depressed by low N, K, or Ca, but not by low P. At harvest, seeds from low Nand P treatments usually showed the same germination as that of seeds receiving complete solution. However, K deficiency resulted in lower germination in some experiments, as did Ca deficiency in carrots and peppers. In storage, seeds from low K and Ca treatments declined in germination faster than did seeds from the complete-solution treatments.
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General Information

Facts about the Hopland field station
by A.H. Murphy
pp4, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p4
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Building a research program: 1951--1976
by A.H. Murphy, R.M. Love, W.C. Weir
pp5-6, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p5
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Extending the knowledge
Editors
pp7, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p7
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Coyote is chief predator
Editors
pp11, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p11
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Deer studey yields management clues
Editors
pp12, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p12
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Watershed I
Editors
pp17-19, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p17
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Watershed II
Editors
pp19-21, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p19
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Brush management facts
Editors
pp25, doi#10.3733/ca.v030n07p25
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