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California Agriculture, November 1960

Volume 14, Number 11
Forage production on irrigated pastures

research articles

Imported french parasite of walnut aphid established in California
by E. I. Schlinger, K. S. Hagen, R. Van den Bosch
pp3-4, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p3
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Imported from in 1959, a tiny wasp—Trioxys pallidus Haliday—a natural parasitic enemy of the walnut aphid—Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach)—has become established, at least locally, in California.
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Potentially serious cotton disease angular leaf spot established in California
by W. C. Schnathorst, P. M. Halisky
pp5-6, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p5
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Angular leaf spot of cotton is caused by the bacterium—Xanthomonas malvacearum—which enters the plant through wounds or natural openings. Circular translucent lesions on cotyledons, angular lesions on leaves, systemic infection of leaves, stem lesions, and boll rot—all caused by the pathogen—have been observed in California. Yield of cotton may be affected by the disease indirectly, by stunting and premature defoliation of plants, or directly, by loss of bolls due to boll rot.
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Nitrogen fertilization of irrigated pastures to improve forage production capacity
by Maurice L. Peterson, Leo E. Bendixen
pp7-8, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p7
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing production costs are forcing many growers to consider nitrogen fertilization as one means of increasing yields of irrigated pastures.
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Picking efficiency of cotton picker improved by unsynchronized speeds
by L. M. Carter, J. R. Tavernetti
pp9, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p9
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Picking efficiency of barbed-spindle cotton pickers was increased an average of 2.5% in a field test in the San Joaquin Valley.
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Cattle feeding trials with acorns and oak leaves indicate need for supplementing dry range forage
by Kenneth A. Wagnon
pp10-12, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p10
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The incidence of deformed calves—acorn calves—has decreased with the widening use of supplemental range feeding and improved breeding herd management. Some stockmen operating in oak areas in California have long considered that consumption of acorns by pregnant range cattle contributed to the birth of deformed calves, to loss of weight, abortions, and even death. Other stockmen have claimed acorns were not harmful but were good cattle feed.
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Nutritional needs of fruit trees indicated by leaf analysis
by Omund Lilleland, K. Uriu
pp12, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p12
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Deficiencies and excesses of essential elements occur in various California orchards. A major research project is aimed at detecting those faults and restoring the fruit trees to healthy and profitable condition.
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Plant breeding of commercial peppers for disease resistance
by Paul G. Smith, L. F. Lippert
pp13, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p13
Abstract
Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Many forms of peppers varying widely in fruit size, shape, flavor, color and pungency are encompassed in the genus Capsicum. The commercial types grown in California include Bell or sweet peppers and Floral Gem for the fresh market and for processing; pimiento for processing; and pungent chili types for the fresh market, for canning, and dehydration.
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Editorial, News, Letters and Science briefs

Principal damage of green apple aphid
by P. H. Westigard, H. F. Madsen
pp14, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p14c
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New method for measuring movement of soil water
by D. R. Nielsen
pp14, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p14a
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Mechanical grape harvest
by A. J. Winkler, L. H. Lamouria
pp14, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p14d
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Black-eyed peas as swine feed
by Hubert Heitman
pp14, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p14e
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Seedless watermelons: In southern California
by L. F. Lippert
pp14, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p14b
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Nematode control for deciduous fruit and nut trees
by B. F. Lownsbery
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15f
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Plastic covers for vegetable crop frost protection
by C. A. Shadbolt
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15c
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Elongation and bending of asparagus spears
by L. L. Morris, A. E. Watada
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15b
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Fruit cartons in bulge test
by Rene Guillou
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15e
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Virus disease of the granulate cutworm
by Edward A. Steinhaus
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15d
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Solvent seasoning of redwood
by W. B. Fearing
pp15, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p15a
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Study of diurnal changes in plant transpiration
by Yoash Vaadia
pp16, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p16
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Onion downy mildew

by C. E. Yarwood
pp595-691, doi#10.3733/hilg.v14n11p595
Abstract
Abstract does not appear. First page follows. Introduction Downy mildew of onion, caused by Peronospora destructor Berk., is the most important disease of the onion seed crop in California. It is serious on onions grown for bulbs and greens not only here but also in other onion-growing regions throughout the world. Though the disease probably occurs in most regions every year, severe losses are rather sporadic, as is the case with many diseases caused by downy mildews. Most previous attempts to devise control methods for the disease have been unsuccessful. The present study was started in 1935 and is devoted to various biological aspects of the disease and to its control. The work was done in the greenhouse in Berkeley unless otherwise mentioned. The principal literature concerning onion mildew is briefly reviewed, more attention being given to the controversial aspects. Most field observations were made on onions grown for seed, and generalizations in this paper refer to and are based on the California seed crop. California grows from about 1,000 to 7,000 acres of onions for seed annually (72) 3 with a production of perhaps 300,000 to 1,500,000 pounds and a value of perhaps $300,000 to $1,000,000 (no official estimates available). From 1918 to 1929 (72) California produced about 95 per cent of the total onion seed for the United States. Since then, partly because of destructive onion-mildew epidemics in California, some of the seed industry has been moved to Oregon and Idaho. The California bulb crop, varying from about 5,000 to 10,000 acres, produces about 1,000,000 to 1,5001,000 sacks at a value of about $1,000,000 to $1,800,000 (7). California produced about 9 per cent of the total United States crop of onion bulbs during 1935 to 1940. By counties, in approximate order of importance
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Onion downy mildew

by C. E. Yarwood
pp595-691, doi#10.3733/hilg.v14n11p595
Abstract
Abstract does not appear. First page follows. Introduction Downy mildew of onion, caused by Peronospora destructor Berk., is the most important disease of the onion seed crop in California. It is serious on onions grown for bulbs and greens not only here but also in other onion-growing regions throughout the world. Though the disease probably occurs in most regions every year, severe losses are rather sporadic, as is the case with many diseases caused by downy mildews. Most previous attempts to devise control methods for the disease have been unsuccessful. The present study was started in 1935 and is devoted to various biological aspects of the disease and to its control. The work was done in the greenhouse in Berkeley unless otherwise mentioned. The principal literature concerning onion mildew is briefly reviewed, more attention being given to the controversial aspects. Most field observations were made on onions grown for seed, and generalizations in this paper refer to and are based on the California seed crop. California grows from about 1,000 to 7,000 acres of onions for seed annually (72) 3 with a production of perhaps 300,000 to 1,500,000 pounds and a value of perhaps $300,000 to $1,000,000 (no official estimates available). From 1918 to 1929 (72) California produced about 95 per cent of the total onion seed for the United States. Since then, partly because of destructive onion-mildew epidemics in California, some of the seed industry has been moved to Oregon and Idaho. The California bulb crop, varying from about 5,000 to 10,000 acres, produces about 1,000,000 to 1,5001,000 sacks at a value of about $1,000,000 to $1,800,000 (7). California produced about 9 per cent of the total United States crop of onion bulbs during 1935 to 1940. By counties, in approximate order of importance
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General Information

Cooperative buying for mass merchandising by retail grocery firms
by D. B. Deloach
pp2-3, doi#10.3733/ca.v014n11p2
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